Coeliac disease is a condition where the body’s immune system attacks its own tissues when gluten is consumed. This causes damage to the lining of the gut and means the body can’t properly absorb nutrients from food. You may or may not have digestive symptoms associated with ingesting gluten, but even if you are asymptomatic, continuing to consume gluten will be damaging your gut lining and likely lead to nutritional deficiencies, such as B12, vitamin D, iron and calcium. Coeliac disease is treated with a strict gluten free diet. People with a newly diagnosed or active Coeliac Disease often have intolerances to certain foods because their gut is inflamed and very sensitive. To overcome this, temporary dietary modifications in addition to the gluten free diet may be required. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

To date, we do not have a test to diagnose NCWPS- the only way to diagnose it is by doing a blind placebo controlled challenge, which is impractical outside a research setting. Similarly to IBS, NCWPS can only be diagnosed once the necessary tests are completed to rule out organic disease (i.e Crohn’s, Ulcerative Colitis, Coeliac Disease, amongst others). It is still unclear which component of wheat is responsible for causing symptoms. It could be the proteins in wheat or fructans within wheat. This is a topic for an ongoing debate in research, however, in clinical practice, it is not as relevant, because wheat fructans and wheat proteins come together in foods; therefore, if you avoid one, you will be cutting out the other. However, unlike in IBS where people have a level of tolerance to the trigger foods, in NCWPS the avoidance of triggers often need to be a lot stricter. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition that causes symptoms, such as stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation. The exact cause is unknown, but it’s been linked to oversensitive nerves in your gut, imbalance in gut bacteria and food intolerances. It’s usually a lifelong problem with no cure and the symptoms tend to come and go over time, but can last for days, weeks or months at a time. Despite it being seen as a ‘lesser diagnosis’ by some clinicians, IBS can have a huge impact on peoples’ quality of life and has even been associated with mental health issues, such as anxiety and depression. Although there’s no cure for IBS, dietary and lifestyle changes can often help control the symptoms and allow people to feel in control. The treatment usually depends on the suspected triggers and an individualised approach is key. IBS is called a syndrome for a reason- there is no ‘one size fits all’ in terms of treatment and individual circumstances and symptom profile will determine what dietary and lifestyle recommendations are made. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Eoesinophilic Oesophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated condition where the oesophagus gets inflamed leading to issues with swallowing solids and food getting stuck in the oesophagus, sometimes causing temporary food bolus obstruction. This condition is diagnosed by taking a biopsy (sample of tissue) of the oesophagus during an endoscopy. The tissue samples are then analysed for the number of eosinophils (specific cells involved in inflammation) aka “eosinophil count”. If your eosinophil count is > 15 per high power field, you will be diagnosed with EoE. Although the mechanisms are not yet well understood, food allergens such as milk, soya, wheat and egg often trigger this condition. It is classified as a ‘non IgE mediated allergy’ so allergy tests (skin prick tests and specific IgE blood tests) are not always able to identify the foods that trigger the EoE. Currently the most effective dietary treatment for EoE is a six food elimination diet (SFED), but you may be recommend a four food elimination diet (FFED) depending on the results of the initial assessment. Whether it’s a SFED or FFED, the diet will usually need to be followed for 6 weeks. If symptoms have improved, foods are then reintroduced one at a time to identify the trigger allergens. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Bile Acid Malabsorption (BAM) is a common and under-diagnosed condition. It can cause diarrhoea, faecal incontinence, abdominal pain, wind and bloating. If you do not have enough bile to digest your food, you may notice the passage of pale, fatty stools and, in some cases, experience weight loss. Your doctor may suspect BAM and decide to go for a trial of bile acid binders or refer you to a dietitian for dietary management. Alternatively, you may be diagnosed by having a special scan called SeHCAT. Mild BAM can be managed with diet alone, however, if you have moderate or severe BAM, you will require bile acid binders alongside dietary adjustments. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis are the two main types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis are chronic conditions, meaning that they are life-long, although you may have periods of good health (remission) as well as times when symptoms are more active (relapses or flare-ups). It’s crucial to be closely monitored by your IBD team, because every flare-up can make your IBD worse, which is particularly true if you have Crohn’s. At present there is no cure for IBD, but diet, drugs, and sometimes surgery, can give long periods of relief from symptoms. Diet can be used to induce remission in Crohn’s, reduce the risk of further relapse and ameliorate the unpleasant gut symptoms during flare-ups of both Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis. Nutrient deficiencies are common, especially in people who have had parts of their bowels removed or who are experiencing frequent or prolonged flare-ups. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

When we eat, food passes through the oesophagus into the stomach where it is digested by stomach enzymes. There is a band of muscle at the base of the oesophagus, called oesophageal sphincter. This muscle relaxes to allow the food in to the stomach, but tightens up when food is in the stomach, preventing acid from leaking up into the oesophagus. Sometimes the sphincter does not work very well, allowing acid to enter the oesophagus. The stomach lining is coated with mucous, which helps prevent damage to the stomach. However, the oesophagus does not have this lining, so the acid causes inflammation, pain and damage to the lining if left untreated. Some people are able to control their reflux with dietary and lifestyle changes alone, while others require medication in addition. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a condition where the pancreas do not produce enough digestive enzymes or there is a miss-match in the timing of the food passing through the digestive tract and the enzymes coming into the digestive tract. Irrespective to the cause of EPI, it leads to a number of issues, including digestive symptoms, nutrient deficiencies and, in more severe cases, weight loss. Ensuring the right nutrition to prevent deficiencies alongside appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation can control this condition. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Non-alcohol related fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition where excess fat is stored in the liver (where this is not caused by heavy alcohol intake). There are two stages in this disease, but luckily, most people who make positive nutrition and lifestyle changes do not progress to the more severe, often irreversible stage. The first stage is fatty liver, or steatosis. This is where fat accumulates in the liver cells without any inflammation or scarring. However, for some people, the condition will develop into non- alcohol related steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH may cause scarring to the liver, and can progress to cirrhosis. Cirrhosis causes irreversible damage to the liver and is the most severe stage of NAFLD. Dietary and lifestyle changes, if started early enough, can help you heal your liver and/or prevent the disease progression. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Food intolerance is not the same as allergy. Food intolerance may lead to digestive, skin or neurological symptoms, but immune system is not usually involved. The most common foodstuffs that people are intolerant to are caffeine, alcohol, spices, fermentable carbohydrates, lactose, fructose and vasoactive amines. There are no reliable tests available to diagnose food intolerances*, therefore it is best if you see an experienced dietitian who will do an assessment and guide you through an elimination diet, that is most likely to benefit you, based on your symptoms and medical background… This way you will be able to identify what exactly your body is sensitive to and avoid restricting your diet unnecessarily. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

*you can have breath tests done to see whether you have issues with malabsorbing lactose and fructose; however, these tests are time-consuming and a positive test does not necessarily mean you must avoid these foods (sometimes people who have test results saying that they do not absorb lactose or fructose well have no symptoms as a result, therefore, there is no need to avoid these in the diet).

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder seen in women. It has three main features: irregular periods, signs of excess ‘male’ hormones and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis is made if at least two of the before-mentioned features are present. Although cause-effect has not been established and genetic predisposition and epigenetics, amongst other factors, are likely to blame, certain dietary and lifestyle habits have been linked with symptom improvement and reduction in PCOS-related health complications. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for developing diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, and dietary and lifestyle changes can make a huge difference to the prevention of these long-term health conditions. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) arises from suppression of the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis leading to oestrogen deficiency. The loss of oestrogen has profound negative effects on many organ systems throughout the body, including the heart, bones, mental health as well as menstrual cycles and fertility. FHA is usually related to a combination of factors, including psychological stress, excessive exercise and inadequate nutrition. For many it is all too overwhelming to address the potential culprits alone, therefore, I support women in understanding what changes need to be made in order to restore the balance of their hormones. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Painful and heavy periods are one of the most common reasons for a referral to a gynaecologist and can have a profound negative impact on a woman’s quality of life. Sometimes medications or other medical interventions are required, however, making changes to the diet and lifestyle in addition can help optimise the management and allow women to feel in control. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of heavy periods, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

Fibroids are non-cancerous overgrowths of the muscle of the wall of the uterus and they are often linked with heavy periods and pain. Fibroids are common*, but they do not necessarily cause problems for every woman. However, some women suffer with severe pain in their lower abdomen, have heavy and painful periods and may also struggle with bloating and constipation. Although cause-effect has not been established and genetic predisposition, amongst other factors, is likely to blame, certain dietary and lifestyle habits have been linked with symptom improvement in hormone-driven conditions, such as fibroids. Optimising nutrition and adopting positive lifestyle changes alongside conventional medicine can help reduce the suffering and likely the disease progression. Gut symptoms, such as bloating and constipation, can exacerbate the pelvic pain, so dietary changes to address this can be very helpful too. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

*It’s estimated that about 70% of women will have a fibroid at some point

Endometriosis is a disease where tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterus, commonly on the ovaries, bowel and bladder. This tissue behaves like the one in the uterus and grows, thickens and sheds like a period, which causes inflammation and scarring and adhesions* around the internal organs. Women suffer with excruciating period pain as a result, often in addition to general chronic pain that goes on throughout the month. Although cause-effect has not been established and genetic predisposition, amongst other factors, is likely to blame, certain dietary and lifestyle habits have been linked with symptom improvement in hormone-driven conditions, such as endometriosis. Although there is no cure for endometriosis, optimising nutrition and adopting positive lifestyle changes alongside conventional medicine can help reduce the suffering and likely the disease progression. Gut symptoms, such as bloating and constipation, can exacerbate abdominal pain, so dietary changes to address this can be very helpful too. If you would like to discuss how I could support you in the management of this condition, please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.

*Adhesions are bands of scar tissue that can make the tissues and organs inside your body stick together.

Menopause is a natural part of ageing, but it is too often brushed away as something women need to ‘just get on with’. From a biological perspective, menopause affects far more than fertility. Between 45 and 55 years of age a woman’s oestrogen levels decline. Oestrogen receptors (target points) are all over our body, therefore the symptoms from these hormonal shifts can be very widespread. For example, we have oestrogen receptors in the brain, the muscles, the skin and the gut, and the hormone-related upset to these organs can be significant and have a huge impact on our wellbeing. Appropriate nutrition and lifestyle changes can help ameliorate these effects, alleviating the burden of the symptoms. I offer an assessment on how your current dietary habits align with the recommendations for eating well during menopause, followed by support and coaching on achieving your individual goals. Please do not hesitate to arrange a free introductory call.